Blog

05 December 2014

Vipassana: rebooting the software of your mind

|
0 Comment

by Sunty Taylor

[groups_non_member group=”Registered”]My first weekend back home in Milan, after having just emerged from the last Vipassana retreat. A lovely, quiet time with the family, reconnecting. A time to savour the after-effects of a full-on spiritual detox. I’m in a state of grace. Immensely grateful and fully aware of the great good fortune to have had the door opened to me. Doing Vipassana is not, as Burgs says, for the faint-hearted, but what a challenge (and a relief) to finally confront those gremlins that sabotage us every which way! On this particular retreat I had the opportunity to dig up and identify some gritty old stuff that I’ve always assumed had nothing to do with me. Wrong!!

 

To read this entire blog please log in

[/groups_non_member][groups_member group=”Registered”]My first weekend back home in Milan, after having just emerged from the last Vipassana retreat. A lovely, quiet time with the family, reconnecting. A time to savour the after-effects of a full-on spiritual detox. I’m in a state of grace. Immensely grateful and fully aware of the great good fortune to have had the door opened to me. Doing Vipassana is not, as Burgs says, for the faint-hearted, but what a challenge (and a relief) to finally confront those gremlins that sabotage us every which way! On this particular retreat I had the opportunity to dig up and identify some gritty old stuff that I’ve always assumed had nothing to do with me. Wrong!! Stalking those rabbits or waiting patiently to grab them by the ears as they popped up from their warrens was one of the most difficult and painful experiences I’ve ever gone through; tough and uncomfortable territory to cross but, ultimately, so rewarding.

I cannot, in all truth, say that this was an easy retreat. No, it was not a picnic and the sandwiches were not always to my liking. But here’s the rub: everything after that has a flavour that exceeds anything else I’ve ever tasted. The shift in my level of awareness has left me quietly and joyfully tingling. Learning Dhamma, for me, is like having my software reset and eliminating some of the bugs that cause such havoc. A kind of anti-virus protection that you’ve got to download regularly to keep your system safe. I have been incredibly fortunate and blessed to have found such an extraordinary teacher in Burgs and my gratitude is boundless. A curiosity: my suitcase weighed almost 3 kilos more when I checked it in at Heathrow than it did when I checked in at Milan airport. Strange, I thought, given that I hadn’t packed anything other than what I had brought.

I mentioned this to my 17 year old son as I was unpacking on Saturday morning. “Mummy”, he said, with his unique brand of wisdom and insouciance, “it’s not your suitcase that was heavier, just you that was lighter.”  And that, I believe, just about sums it up.

Thank you, thank you, thank you.[/groups_member]

Leave a Reply